Don't be afraid to dream.

I am that heathen...who wears his heart on his sleeve and keeps on dream'n. I am naked flaws exposing truth by questioning. I am some human who can't really breathe in the norms of mainstream society, thus makes I an enemy to culture. I am just a clone in reverie.

dreamswork:

digg:

*Kisses a traffic light*

whoa

ex0skeletal:

Fun shark attack facts:

  • In 1996, toilets injured 43,000 Americans a year. Sharks injured 13.
  • In 1996, 2,600 Americans were injured by room fresheners. Sharks injured 13.
  • In 1996, buckets and pails injured almost 11,000 Americans. Sharks injured 13.
  • For every human killed by a shark, humans kill approximately two million sharks.

Conclusions:

  1. Humans are assholes.
  2. Sharks are not assholes.
  3. Apparently everyone in 1996 lived in a real-life infomercial.

(via twelfth-helix)

perpetual-dawn:

Venus is the second closest planet to the Sun and has the highest surface temperature of any planet in our solar system, with an orbital period of about 225 Earth days. Because of its similar gravity and size, it is sometimes known as Earth’s “sister planet.” However, besides these two aspects, the two planets have almost nothing in common. With the densest atmosphere on any terrestrial planet in the solar system, the surface pressure on Venus is about 92 times that of Earth; the same pressure one kilometer beneath Earth’s oceans.

Even though Venus is comparatively much further away from the Sun than Mercury, it is the hotter planet with a surface temperature of around 462 °C; this is because of its dense atmosphere of greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide and sulfur dioxide. One remarkable aspect of the atmosphere of Venus is the precipitation of liquid sulfuric acid. The surface geology of the planet has been observed by NASA for over twenty years now, and it is seen that there is extensive and violent volcanism at the surface.

(image sources: NASA; http://www.the8planets.com/wp-content/gallery/planet-venus/venus-atmosphere.jpg, http://www.boskowan.com/blanensko/)

(via infinity-imagined)

artsytoad:

Vladimir Kush, Ocean Sprout

artsytoad:

Vladimir Kush, Ocean Sprout

(via mindaltering)

vatinime:

untitled by miss.incorrigible on Flickr.
echord:

Samurai: The Legendary Warriors of Japan

echord:

Samurai: The Legendary Warriors of Japan

(via cosmic-rebirth)

pappubahry:

The asteroid Itokawa, photographed by Hayabusa.
Itokawa is by far the smallest object featured on this blog, measuring only about 535 metres in length, and less than 300 metres in width and height.  Its surface gravity is tiny (much less than a millimetre per second squared), so the spacecraft entered an orbit round the sun that was roughly parallel to the asteroid’s orbit, here about 7km away.  So the rotation seen in the gif is Itokawa’s rotation, not the result of a camera orbiting around it.
Hayabusa later landed on the surface, collected some dust, and returned it to Earth for analysis.  Google Images doesn’t seem to know of the photos near the surface, so I uploaded most of the good ones to an Imgur album here (edit: Google Images doesn’t recognise the photos I upload to it, but searching for ‘itokawa surface’ brings up some scattered results).  I wouldn’t have guessed that a small asteroid would comprise lots of little rocks, just barely held together by their very weak gravity.  But apparently such rubble piles are common.

pappubahry:

The asteroid Itokawa, photographed by Hayabusa.

Itokawa is by far the smallest object featured on this blog, measuring only about 535 metres in length, and less than 300 metres in width and height.  Its surface gravity is tiny (much less than a millimetre per second squared), so the spacecraft entered an orbit round the sun that was roughly parallel to the asteroid’s orbit, here about 7km away.  So the rotation seen in the gif is Itokawa’s rotation, not the result of a camera orbiting around it.

Hayabusa later landed on the surface, collected some dust, and returned it to Earth for analysis.  Google Images doesn’t seem to know of the photos near the surface, so I uploaded most of the good ones to an Imgur album here (edit: Google Images doesn’t recognise the photos I upload to it, but searching for ‘itokawa surface’ brings up some scattered results).  I wouldn’t have guessed that a small asteroid would comprise lots of little rocks, just barely held together by their very weak gravity.  But apparently such rubble piles are common.

(via infinity-imagined)

theuppitynegras:

I’m about 90% sure the economy is never gonna “improve” 

this is capitalism in it’s final form

this is it honey 

(via mindaltering)

ted:

Happy Earth Day! The stunning photos above show the Sacred Headwaters, a pristine area of protected land in a remote corner of northern British Columbia. The area is about the size of the entire state of Oregon, and only one tiny road winds through it. (For context, on the US mainland, the farthest you can get from a maintained road is about 20 miles. Oregon is 98,466 square miles.)

Watch the full talk here »

(via mindaltering)

america-wakiewakie:

Running on E

“Under capitalism, we can’t have Democracy by definition. Capitalism is a system in which the central institutions of society are in principle under autocratic control. Thus, a corporation or an industry is, if we were to think of it in political terms, fascist.”

—   Noam Chomsky  (via america-wakiewakie)

(via hypgnostic)

(Source: journey2oneness, via elige)